Warm Welcome to our new Photographers!

2016 has seen an expansion of our X-ile Project team with new photographers joining us around the country. This round of shoots have been an enriching experience with our first participants of 2016 and our brilliant photographers, who volunteer their time and skills to progress women's rights in Ireland. This year we are joined by photographers Emma Campbell (Belfast), Rachel McIntyre (Dublin), Sue Rainsford (Dublin), and Leann Rigney (Dublin). We are still adding photographers (and participants!) for X-ile Project and look forward to working with many more women in the future.

We are especially delighted to have strong support in Belfast through Emma Campbell's work on behalf of X-ile Project. It is vitally important that X-ile Project continue to expand throughout the country and make sure that the experiences of women all over Ireland, and beyond, are represented in the gallery. 

Find out a little more about our photographers and their experience working with X-ile Project below.

Leann Rigney is a Dublin based freelance fine art photographer who works predominantly with themes of personal exploration of femininity. She holds a BA (Hons) degree in Photography from Dún Laoghaire Institute of Art, Design and Technology. 

 



Originally from Donegal, Rachel McIntyre currently lives in Dublin and works in a contemporary art gallery. She is a Art History graduate of Trinity College Dublin. Usually shooting with film, Rachel has been taking photographs in various capacities for several years.

"Photography's great power manifests as an ability to open discourse, often unintended by the viewer. Photography unifies with this ability, and enables discussion and explanation of the topic portrayed, or that which is perceived to be portrayed. It is for this reason that I personally, deeply value the role of the image in a work that strives to effect social change."

- Leann Rigney on the power of X-ile Project, February 2016

"I enjoyed the whole experience! It was lovely to meet the participants. They were all so accommodating and made my role as photographer extremely simple." 

- Rachel McIntyre on her involvement in X-ile Project, Feb 2016

Photographer Rachel McIntyre with Paula, Dublin, February 2016.

Photographer Rachel McIntyre with Paula, Dublin, February 2016.

Photographer Sue Rainsford with Julie. Dublin shoot, February 2016

Photographer Sue Rainsford with Julie. Dublin shoot, February 2016

Photographer Leann Rigney with Laura. Dublin shoot, February 2016

Photographer Leann Rigney with Laura. Dublin shoot, February 2016

Photographer Emma Campbell with Julie. Belfast, February 2016

Photographer Emma Campbell with Julie. Belfast, February 2016

Originally from Belfast, Emma Campbell studied Documentary Photography at Newport until 2000, after which she relocated to London to work in the photographic industry for over a decade. Recently relocated home, Emma gained a Masters of Fine Art in Photography from the University of Ulster under Paul Seawright, Donovan Wylie and Kaylynn Deveney in 2012. The study continues at U.U, with a practice-based PhD researching the impact of women’s documentary photography in the UK.

Sue Rainsford is a writer, researcher and photographer based in Dublin, Ireland. A graduate of Trinity College and IADT, Sue is the editor of some mark made, and is currently pursuing her MFA in Writing & Literature at Bennington College, Vermont.

 

"[X-ile Project] shows people that abortion is a common and normal experience. It shows us that real women sometimes have abortions and then continue with their lives. It puts a face to an everyday experience for Irish women"

- Emma Campbell on X-ile Project, February 2016



"The level of stigma women in Ireland encounter on a daily basis is untenable, and it's a stigma which pervasive quality has yet to be fully recognised. X-ile Project is important because it simply and powerfully underscores this stigma, while offering a simple and powerful means to subvert it. It gives women in Ireland a level of visibility our government currently denies them." 

- Sue Rainsford on X-ile Project, February 2016